Let’s Make Scrubbies

Title Page Scrubby

I love to make scrubbies, and after you’ve read this post, I hope you’ll love making them as well!  In this post, I will share a four-part video series to show you how to make the a scrubby, the perfect tool for cleaning cast iron and a great gift for friends and family.  This is an update on a post I wrote a while back.  I have added videos with more details on the difference between tulle, matte net, and mesh material, how to use a rotary cutter to cut the material into even strips, how to work with the cantankerous material,  how to tie strips together, how to hide the loose ends, and much more.

Scrubbies in Dutch Oven with Llid

Here are my big tips for success in crocheting a scrubby:

  • Use matte net – if you don’t know what this is, ask for help at the fabric counter.  Tulle is too soft and mesh is too tough.  Matte net is the perfect balance of toughness and workability.  Matte Net
  • Work as loosely as possible.  The pointy-crunchy-pokey quality of matte net is what makes a scrubby so wonderful, but it also makes it difficult to pull through the crochet loops.  By working loosely, the crochet loops have more room and the matte net strip is less likely to catch and hang on itself.
  • Be prepared to YANK, and pull, and tug hard to get the matte net strips to move through the crochet loops.  The muscles in your hands will get a work out!
  • To clean a grimy scrubby, put it in the top rack of the dishwasher.
  • Purchase three yards of matte net.  I found it on sale at Joann’s for $1.00 a yard.  Regular price was $1.49 a yard.  This should be enough material to make several scrubbies.  If you are like me, you will want several yards of every color available so that you can mix and match colors.  The combinations are endless!Bursting strips of matte net

In Part One (6 minutes), I show what an old scrubby looks and feels like, the difference between tulle, matte net, and mesh (I use matte net), and how to cut strips of matte net with a rotary cutter and mat.

Close Up of ScrubbiesIn Part Two (8 minutes), I show how to manage the unruly strips, how to crochet the base ring (chain 3), and how to double crochet around the ring to make the first (inner) round of the scrubby.  The first round has approximately 15 double crochets.

In Part Two A:  (8 minutes), I show how to attach a new color and crochet the second round.  There are twice the number of double crochets (30) in the second round as are in the first round.

In Part Three (10 minutes), I show how to crochet the third and fourth rounds and how to end it.  The third round has approximately 45 double crochets. The fourth round has 45 single crochets.  Close Up of Scrubbies in a Dutch Oven

Bonus!  Cleaning cast iron can be misunderstood.  Here are some excellent resources about care of cast iron.

I hope this video series inspires you to grab your crochet hook and start making scrubbies! If you do, please leave a comment telling me about your scrubby or share your favorite tip for cleaning up a dirty camp Dutch oven.  I love hearing from you!

 

 

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Field Peas and Ham

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My first taste of field peas was a few months ago at our local Dutch Oven Gathering (DOG) when my good friend Robin made a pot.  I will never forget loving every flavor-packed morsel I put into my mouth and thinking to myself, “How in the world have I missed out on this for so long?”  I love field peas!!!  After learning how to cook them I realized that the reason I love them is that they are very similar to pinto beans.  Same texture and flavor, and similar cooking process.  The main difference is that pintos have to soak over night before cooking but field peas do not.

Robin told me that field peas are a staple for southern cooking and is a crop that is grown to feed cattle.  When Dennis was a youngster, he would pick field peas from the side of the road in east Texas.  One time, a neighbor invited him to pick peas after the harvest.  He brought in a bushel that he sold to a grateful lady who paid him $5 – a fortune for young Dennis!

Turns out that field peas, which are legumes, come in many different shapes, flavor, texture, and sizes.  This article by Southern Living describes several different types of field peas, and shares some helpful tips about buying them fresh, freezing them,  and lots of recipes.  These legumes are a great source of protein, fiber, and potassium.Frozen crowder peas

I made purple hulled peas for our annual Dutch oven demonstration at Log Cabin Village in Fort Worth on the first weekend in January.  They were a huge hit and caught the attention of the Fort Worth Portrait Project.  Raul is a very talented photographer and creator of the project’s website and multiple social media platforms.  Check out the project’s Twitter feed, Facebook page, YouTube, and Instagram accounts, and you will see Raul’s amazing photos and interesting stories of leadership across Fort Worth.  The day after the demo at Log Cabin Village, Raul made field peas and loved them.  He inspired me to write this blog post – thank you Raul!!

Field Peas and Ham
Print Recipe
This simple recipe is easy to make and is certain to be a crowd pleaser at any Dutch oven gathering.
Servings Prep Time
10 hungry friends 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 hungry friends 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Field Peas and Ham
Print Recipe
This simple recipe is easy to make and is certain to be a crowd pleaser at any Dutch oven gathering.
Servings Prep Time
10 hungry friends 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 hungry friends 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: hungry friends
Instructions
  1. Fire up a chimney full of hot charcoal. Make a solid circle of charcoal to fit underneath a 12-inch camp Dutch oven. Place oven over charcoal.
  2. Add oil to hot oven to get hot before adding adding onions and celery. Sauté onions and celery in a 12-inch camp Dutch oven until vegetables are soft. Add garlic and stir for one minute.
  3. Add ham bone and frozen field peas.
  4. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Keep the pot simmering by replacing old charcoal with fresh hot coals as needed. The water will reduce as the peas soften. Because each hame bone or ham hock has a different amount of salt, taste before adding more salt and ground black pepper.
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